Useful Tips for Buying the Right Power Drill

With lockdowns happening all around the world, many people are getting into DIY. From home offices and home gyms to treehouses for your children, you can always make good use of a power drill. There are many different types of power tools and power drills out there; hopefully, after reading this, you will have the necessary knowledge to choose the right power drill for you.

What Are Power Drills Used For

As you probably know, Drills are used for making round holes in various hard materials like bricks and woods. Drills are also used for fastening or driving screws. The electric motor in power drills allows them to drill holes into extremely hard surfaces. The surfaces that you will be working with will help guide your decision as to which type of drill to buy. If you only need to do odd jobs, such as hanging pictures and mirrors, then a relatively inexpensive 8-10 volt drill should be perfect for you.

Types of Power Drills

For starters, you may first want to choose between corded and cordless power drills. You can check out the reviews of the many corded and cordless power drills before parting with your hard-earned cash. Cordless power drills tend to be heavier because of the battery. Consequently, most corded power drills are lighter but more powerful because of the constant energy source. Your decision between corded versus cordless should largely depend on what type of work you are doing. If you are only drilling the odd shelf around the house, then the quick and painless cordless drill will be your best bet. However, if you are drilling for longer periods and require more power to get through masonry, you will get more out of the corded drill.

Cordless drills have different power sources, each with different characteristics and prices. These days cordless drills generally come with a lithium-ion battery known for being light and powerful. Another option is a Nickel Cadmium battery, which is cheaper. NiCads, however, lose capacity over time, which is called the “memory effect.” You can avoid the “memory effect” by draining the battery before you recharge it again.

Asides from the power source characteristics, there are still plenty of different types of power drills. Rotary hammers have a pounding action and a rotation; these are best used for masonry, concrete, and stone. Impact drivers come with as much as three times more torque than a regular power drill, making these your fastening jobs. The heavy-duty version of this is the impact wrench. These are used in more complicated applications, such as construction, assembly, and automotive. As evident by their name, right-angled drills have a chuck angled at ninety degrees to help you access tricky areas. An air drill produces its rotational power by using compressed air. They can be lighter and smaller while still delivering the same amount of power as an electric drill. Air drills make use of air compressors, which can be expensive and make a lot of noise.

power drill

Choosing The Right Drill

Like with any product, you should do your research and shop around. Speak to neighbors, friends, and colleagues about the power drills they use and read reviews before you by your drill. You will increase your chances of getting a bargain or quality for a reasonable price by doing this.

Choosing the right drill means choosing the drill that will do the job for you the best. Take stock of the jobs that you need to do at home, write them down. When you head to the department store or speak to a consultant, explain what you need the drill for and list a few of the tasks. This will help you get closer to the range of drills that are going to be of use to you. With your understanding of the different types of drills, as outlined earlier, you can now choose a drill you feel is right for you. If you are not going to be using the drill a lot, then a cordless drill with a small battery might be fine for you and save you some money. If you are purchasing your drill for a big project, like building a house, then you might be considering a corded rotary hammy that you will be able to use to drill into dense materials.

Hopefully, you now have an idea of the different drill options available to you and how to go about purchasing the right one. Remember, before you go out looking for power drills, you need to consider the type of work you need the drill for.

Source: Upscale Living Magazine

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