CBS Brings Back Iconic ‘Feel The Heat’ Daytime Campaign From 1985 – Deadline

CBS is going old school this summer to help promote its most-watched daytime lineup.

Beginning tonight, the network is bringing back its iconic “Feel the Heat” campaign from 1985 that featured the Robert Palmer song “Some Like It Hot”over scenes of CBS soap stars canoodling, hugging and, ahem, taking showers.

The new, pastel-colored promos use the same song and have the same feel. They will promote the CBS sudsers The Young and the Restless and The Bold and the Beautiful, as well as The Talk, The Price is Right, and Let’s Make a Deal.

The idea to dust off the old campaign came from CBS Entertainment President Kelly Kahl.

“He stumbles upon things and we share with each other. Kelly was cracking up look at the old spots from daytime, and so I asked why can’t we bring that back in some way?” said President and Chief Marketing Officer Mike Benson. “Nostalgia is really resonating with audiences today. People want to go back in a time that they remember when life was different and simpler.”

Shortly after launching the campaign in the ’80s, CBS began its winning streak in daytime. Benson hopes the Palmer tune will keep CBS Daytime in the winners circle by bringing back memories for soap fans. “When you use music in your marketing, it’s a short cut to emotional engagement, especially to audiences who remember songs like that,” he said.

Here’s the original spot that also includes lots of death stares from angry divas and … lightning! Nothing says heat in daytime than thunder and lightning.

Source: Deadline

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